Perth Night Noodle Markets, Northbridge

IMG_2972In November last year, I had the chance to visit the amazing Night Noodle Markets in Melbourne (not a market that just sells noodles). This month, I was thrilled when I heard they were finally bringing it to Perth, along with stalls from the eastern states as part of the festival Eat Drink Perth.

After much hype, I rocked up on the opening night thirty minutes early. The plan was to get in and out before the massive crowds flooded the area, as well as take advantage of the natural lighting while the sun was still out.

IMG_2937

IMG_2929

Masak Masak Masak Masak a business from Collingwood, Victoria was the first stall I tried at the Night Noodle Market. They were set up at the Urban Orchard area, and serve a variety of dishes like Beef Rendang with Coconut Sticky Rice ($15) and Crispy Prawn Wontons ($10).

IMG_2944

I ordered the Pork Belly with pickled vegetables and palm sugar caramel ($15). The pork crackling was crispy on the top, but a little bit chewy which didn’t affect its flavour when mixed with the vegetables.

IMG_2951

We also ordered a Snow Pear Slushy ($5), which was served in a plastic bag, similar to other traditional drinks served at hawker stalls across Asia. It's a sweet and icey drink, very refreshing on a hot night.

Masak Masak on Urbanspoon

Pasar Malam Due to the large variety of options at the Melbourne Night Noodle Market, I didn’t get to try Pasar Malam. This time, I was very excited to sample something from their menu, as it reminded me of familiar Singaporean flavours which I love so much.

IMG_2958

I settled on the Chilli Soft Shell Crab ($15), which was a small portion of crab served with two deep fried mantou buns. This tasted exactly like Singaporean chilli crab but was definitely easier to eat, the eggy sauce was not too spicy and the golden buns were perfect to wipe up the leftover sauce. I could eat this all day!

IMG_2957

I also ordered a serve of Sweet Potato Balls ($9), which was very expensive seeing as there were only 9 or 10 of these marble sized balls in the paper cone. Even though they were pricey, they were deliciously crispy on the outside and slightly chewy on the inside, a really nice snack.

Pasar Malam on Urbanspoon

Apple Daily Bar and Eating House

On the first floor of Print Hall at Brookfield Place you’ll find Apple Daily, a restaurant serving Asian street style food. Although I have not been to the restaurant, I’ve heard good things and decided to sample something from their market stall.

IMG_2988

The Linley Valley Pork Ribs, with tamarind, chilli and coriander ($12) were perfectly cooked, the meat fell of the bone and the flavours were paired well. But, I’ve also heard through social media, that some people had meat that was overcooked and tough or chewy. Luckily for me, this was not the case, possibly because we were early and the large rack of ribs is left on the heat all night to stay warm.

Masak Masak on Urbanspoon

Verdict

It is important to prepare yourselves, as you’ll be paying over inflated prices for little portions, and wait in long lines. Hoy Pinoy, a business from Melbourne had lines as long as an hour, which is why I gave them a pass this year. But, I’ve previously tried their chicken skewers from the Queen Victoria Markets and they are great.

Overall, The food I tasted that night was all on point, I loved the flavours and would definitely suggest the Pork Belly Salad from Masak Masak and the Chilli Soft Shell Crab from Pasar Malam. Compared to Melbourne, the Perth Night Noodle Markets had less variety but I’m sure over the upcoming years this will expand greatly as more businesses are more aware to participate.

IMG_2977

The Sarapan, Victoria Park

IMG_2795 This pop-up brunch venue on Leonard Street, have name themselves ‘Sarapan’ meaning ‘breakfast’ in Malay. Serving both Malaysian and Western dishes, what really drew me to Sarapan was the Roti Canai and Nasi Lemak. Only open on weekends, this café shares their space with another business, Olive and Figs who serve dinner.

IMG_2793

I really enjoyed the Nasi Lemak ($11.50) here, a dish of fragrant coconut rice and spiced fried chicken served with sambal, anchovies, peanuts, slices of cucumber and boiled egg. The portion of sambal (a southeast Asian chilli sauce) was generous and had a good balance of sweetness, saltiness and spiciness. The fried chicken could have been juicier, but it was fried perfectly with a tasty coating of spices.

IMG_2801

My friend Aaron also ordered an iced Teh Tarik ($4.50), a traditional ‘pulled’ Malaysian milk tea with condensed milk.

IMG_2811

The freshly made Roti Canai ($5) was crispy on the outside, as well as soft and fluffy. It was served with a dahl and chicken curry sauce on the side, for dipping. Even though we were given cutlery, the best technique to eat the roti is to rip it apart with your bare hands. I would come here again to eat this, and maybe add an egg next time for only 50c extra.

IMG_2803

Aaron and I were tossing between the Malaysian style Eggs & Toast ($5) or the Kaya Toast ($5), which we saw scribbled on the bottom of the menu. In the end we chose the Kaya Toast, which was a good choice that reminded us so much of Singapore. ‘Kaya’ is a sweet and creamy coconut spread, which was served with thick slices of white Hainan toast and a good portion of butter. There was enough kaya leftover that we could order an extra piece of toast (only 50c extra) to wipe it up.

IMG_2791

Overall, I think that this quaint pop-up café is worth a visit. The staff are friendly and the service is quick. I will definitely be returning on a weekend to try the Roti Bom ($5) a sweet version of the Roti Canai, served with condensed milk.

Rating: 8.5 out of 10 Sarapan on Urbanspoon